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Twinkies-Maker Files for Chapter 11

Twinkies-Maker Files for Chapter 11


Hostess, maker of Ho Hos and Wonder Bread, files for bankruptcy

Hostess Brands Inc. has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time (the first was in 2004).

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Twinkies producer says the current cost structure is "not competitive" due to labor costs. The sale of Twinkies is also reportedly down, with a 2 percent drop in sales last year.

Hostess also manufactures Ho Hos, Sno Balls, and Wonder Bread, but the Twinkies decline is pretty fascinating, especially considering they're Ferran Adrià-approved. Luckily, the company has enough funding to continue running for now. We're sure plenty of folks will be stockpiling Twinkies for the zombie apocalypse.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

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Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

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Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


Casa Bonita files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Share this:

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Customers have dinner at Casa Bonita Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Casa Bonita cliff diver Jason Wuerz entertains the crowd on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Brandi Lyons, left, and Jason Wuerz, a Casa Bonita cliff diver, entertain the crowd during the Exiting Gunfights show on Jan. 11, 2019, in Lakewood. Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Mexican restaurant Casa Bonita has been a memory-making institution for decades, filling children with countless sopapillas and dreams of plummeting from the top of a man-made, three-story indoor waterfall while people eat tacos, listen to Mariachi music and watch puppet shows around them. Jan. 11, 2019.

After more than a year closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lakewood’s Casa Bonita has filed for bankruptcy.

Summit Family Restaurants, Casa Bonita’s parent company, filed for Chapter 11 protection in Arizona on April 6.

But that doesn’t mean the business is closing for good the Chapter 11 filing should buy Casa Bonita more time to pay off its debts, which amount to $4.4 million, according to court documents. And it could even continue to operate in the meantime.

Court documents show that most of Casa Bonita’s debt is owed to its owner, Summit Family Restaurants, through a capital lease agreement. But after staying closed for the past year, the restaurant is losing around $40,000 a month, court filings state. Now Casa Bonita needs outside investment and a cash flow once again to save itself.

“The restaurant is in big trouble,” said Jaime Zender, finance professor with the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. “As it looks now, without some infusion of cash, they would have to sell the building to satisfy their longterm debt.”

Put another way: The bankruptcy filing is Casa Bonita’s latest (and greatest) sign of life.

Last month, the restaurant’s website announced simply that it would be reopening soon days after a group of local Casa Bonita fans launched an independent “Save Casa Bonita” fundraising campaign. Those fans said they would also be open to working with new investors in order to preserve the iconic business.

Their GoFundMe campaign has raised just over $16,000 to date, and a rally to continue the fundraiser’s momentum will take place in front of the Lakewood restaurant this coming Saturday.


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